The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life

The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life

The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life

  • The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life

The #1 bestseller–now in paperback with a new afterword and Tory’s favorite recipes!

A single conversation with a boss forced Tory Johnson to face the one challenge that had always defeated her: her weight. After a lifetime of obesity, of failing at fad diets and sporadic health programs, Tory made the shift by recognizing that it was time to lose weight once and for all, and do it her way. In twelve months, she lost more than 60 pounds, and for the first time shares what she learned, what she ate and how she changed in The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life, her most personal book yet.

In this updated trade paperback edition, Tory Johnson adds a look back at the amazing response her Shift has brought from thousands of people across the country, shares additional lessons learned in the year following the book’s publication, and includes the stories of “Shifters”–readers so inspired by her book they have made their own life-changing Shifts.

The Shift is not a one-woman weight-loss journey; The Shift is a gutsy look at what it takes to undo a lifetime of self-sabotaging habits and feel great about the change and yourself.

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2 Responses to The Shift: How I Finally Lost Weight and Discovered a Happier Life

  • Book Lover says:
    143 of 148 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Sorry, Tory, but I’m A Cynic, October 4, 2013
    By 
    Book Lover (Anytown) –

    Tory Johnson seems like a genuinely nice, well meaning person and her memoir has some definite takeaways…some great words of wisdom. However, having read countless weight loss memoirs over the years I am painfully aware that every single author has gained a lot of their weight back afterwards. The only exceptions were the memoirs about people who had gastric bypass. Personally, being someone that struggles with my weight myself, I would love to read a memoir written by someone who has maintained that loss for years and how they DID that. Because we all know how to lose the weight. Tory Johnson HERSELF stated that anyone that stays on a diet long enough will eventually be thin. BUT…how do you stay there? Compared to maintaining, actually getting the weight off is a cake walk. I found myself rolling my eyes as soon as she stated that her weight loss journey began two years ago. Which means she hasn’t been thin for very long nor has she maintained for a significant amount of time. Experts will tell you that success weight losses must be maintained for five or more years. Other issues that I had with the book…I feel that Tory’s diet was unrealistically restrictive. It taught her nothing about how to deal with food, and that was underscored by the fact that she went on vacation and ate with abandon and then beat herself up for it. Other criticisms? The self hatred continuously expressed by Tory for her heavier self just made me cringe. It was if she felt she had no value as a person because she was heavy, and that lack of self worth will repeatedly rear its ugly head. I was frustrated when she spoke of her Aha moment…the moment she realized she had to lose weight…when her boss had a meeting with her and cryptically said she wasn’t looking as good as she could and suggested Tory see her stylist. Tory completely twisted that around to mean she was going to get fired for being heavy, and the woman NEVER SAID THAT. Come on, Tory! The woman is a high ranking executive in television, she didn’t get there by pussyfooting around and mincing words….if she wanted you to lose weight, she would have said, “You need to lose weight.” Tory projected that meaning into her words, even by her own admission she usually wore shapeless black clothing and that seemed to me to clearly be the woman’s meaning. She then embarks on an extremely restrictive diet…swearing off carrots because they’re too high in carbs? They’re also high in Vitamin A and betacarotine, two things your body REALLY needs. But she claims that she’s eating a healthy diet. Another cringe worthy moment? When her daughter is being made fun of at school, instead of comforting her, she tells her she needs to lose five pounds, justifying it by saying she wished someone had told her to lose weight when she was younger and it was manageable. Okay, so all those kids that made fun of you through school for being heavy didn’t make it clear to you that you were overweight? As someone that was a chubby kid and was totally harassed by my parents, I wanted to slap her when she did that. If you think your daughter needs to lose weight, then you yourself make adjustments to the diet (switching out whole milk for fat free, for instance) and asking her to accompany you on walks, hikes, exercise related activities. You don’t turn around and tell your child who is hurt by someone else’s cruel words that she needs to lose weight, thereby validating the message that she’s not worthy of love because she’s fat. The final cringe worthy moment? An overweight friend asks her for advice on how to lose weight, and she dismisses her, telling her she’s not ready to lose weight since she’s not willing to give up margheritas with the girls and then smugly states she was just telling her the truth. This from the same woman that was saying repeatedly that not everyone loses weight the same and people have to do with what works for them. So, this woman wasn’t willing to do EXACTLY what she did so she’s not ready to lose weight? A REAL friend, someone supportive, would have said, “okay. What are you willing to give up? What healthy habit can you add (exercise) or unhealthy one can you lose? Just change one thing.” Just a sidenote, I lost sixty seven pounds on Weight Watchers and never gave up my weekly lunches at the all you can eat Chinese buffet with my best friend. I did however, give up plenty of other things instead. Anyway, once again, I am curious to see if the weight stays off…because I, and all other women out there who have lost large amounts of weight know what “the shift” is…it’s that switch in your brain that turns on when you’re dieting and makes you have superhuman willpower. When it’s on, you can resist anything. When it’s off…forget it. And it never stays on. So, I guess we’ll have to check back with Tory in another four or five years and see how she’s doing then.

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  • BB says:
    285 of 299 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    the book in a nutshell: don’t eat, October 1, 2013
    By 
    BB

    I hesitate to write negative reviews of books. This one, though, was not only disappointing, but unhealthy.

    I spent the first few chapters waiting for Tory to “shift” into healthy eating. And I kept reading, and reading and reading more about NOT eating…becoming a pro at moving things around on a plate…avoiding food at parties…cutting out lots of foods entirely, including fruit…only eating vegetables with no carbs.

    In one section of the book Tory recalls when she told her own 14-year-old daughter that she would feel more comfortable if she lost 5 pounds! Talk about starting body image issues early! Let’s not even go into the sex chapter (NOT what I wanted to read).

    This book is about avoiding food, not moderation. Two quotes, “I can no longer think that “just one” cupcake, piece of bread, or potato chip is acceptable…” and “consciously NOT EATING is new and exciting.”

    Books like these just set people up for failure, unless you’re on TV and know that you can get a book deal and lots of press coverage.

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